Fri, Nov 27, 2015The Remote-Control-Of-My-Life Edition

The Accessibility Of The iPhone 6s, by Steven Aquino, TechCrunch

The reason I want to upgrade my phone so often isn’t so much because I’m a nerd or I need it for my job. It’s because my iPhone is the “remote control” of my life. My phone is an indispensable tool, and I want the best tool.

The iPhone 6s fits the bill. It’s the best, most accessible remote control yet.

Follow Up Trust

Samantha Bielefeld Is Victor Johnson: The Story, by Michael Anderson, Building Twenty

Part of the reason I wanted to write this post is that it is a drama that has mainly played out in subtweets and disparate blog posts (and, no doubt, numerous Slack channels that most of us aren’t privy to). So there’s been understandable frustration from some people that they are being asked to make consequential calls on issues as sensitive as someone’s gender or their trustworthiness with scant information to go on.

So primarily I want this post to be an explainer of what we know so far. This is by no means comprehensive - the saga gets ever more complicated the more you delve into it and I’m largely relying on piecing together the same fragments of information as everyone else.


This Amazing App Lets You ‘See’ The Invisible Wi-Fi Signals That Surround You, by Yahoo!

The Architecture of Radio app shows users a 360-degree augmented reality view of the all of the wireless networks around them using their GPS location.

How To Prevent Safari From Launching iTunes, by Bardley Chambers, The Sweet Setup

Thankfully, a great Safari extension takes care of that problem for me. It’s called NoMoreiTunes, and it does exactly what the name implies.

New Apps Can Reduce Food Waste And Help Channel Leftovers To A Good Cause, by Paula Owen, Telegram & Gazette

With 1 million tons ofl food waste and compostable material dumped into landfills annually in Massachusetts, several smartphone apps are available to help consumers and businesses move toward waste-free holiday cooking.


Are My Push Notifications Driving Users Away?, by Mac McKinley


The Filmmaker Forcing The British Board Of Film Classification To Watch Paint Drying For Hours On End, by Anna Leszkiewicz, New Statesman

Would you watch paint dry for several hours? If you work for the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), you might not have much choice in the matter. As a protest against problems he sees within the organisation, British filmmaker and journalist Charlie Lyne has launched a Kickstarter to send the BBFC a film he’s made called Paint Drying. It does what it says on the tin: the film is a single, unbroken shot lasting several hours (its length is determined by the amount of money raised) of white paint slowly drying on a brick wall. Once Lyne has paid the fee, the board are obliged to watch it.

100 Notable Books Of 2015, by New York Times

The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.

I have only read three of the one hundred selected by New York Times. Looks like I need to find a longer way to commute.

(If you are curious, the three books are "Fates and Furies", "A Little Life", and "Purity." If you ask me, I do recommend these three books -- although "A Little Life" may be a little too graphical and explicit and sad. Don't gift "A Little Life" for Christmas, unless you really know the person you are gifting to.)


Thanks for reading. Happy winter reading.